Whistle blows its way into the life of a community

The whistle first stopped blowing when Globe Iron stopped production in Jackson in 1960. Many generations of people of all walks of life structured their days around the whistle blasts and the sounds of the production of silvery pig iron coming from East Main Street.

Then in 1980, the Globe Iron whistle found its way back to industry in Jackson County on the roof of Merillat Industries. The whistle marked time at that factory, still on East Main Street but just a little further south. Cabinetry production ended in Jackson County March 7, 2014.

It is said that Globe had an extended whistle blow to signal Germany's surrender during World War II. Merillat/Masco blew the whistle for a full minute at the end of its final production day March 6.

So are you missing the rhythm of the Globe Iron whistle as part of your every day life?

Here it is as it sounded six days a week for 34 years under the care of Merillat/Masco employees.

5 comments (Add your own)

1. wrote:
Any word on what will happen to it now....so sad....I loved hearing it!

Tue, March 11, 2014 @ 7:10 AM

2. Jenny Massie wrote:
Nice piece of history for Jackson - thanks for posting!

Tue, March 11, 2014 @ 11:37 AM

3. Dr. Fred Livesay wrote:
I was at my grandmother's house (Mrs Hugh(Emma)Schellenger), on Walnut Hills, about where the service station is now, the afternoon Franklin Roosevelt died, April 12, 1945. The Globe Furnace whistle wailed for several minutes. Grandmother called someone to find that FDR had died.

Sun, March 22, 2015 @ 3:43 PM

4. Walt wrote:
After reading the rveiews of others, I excitedly bought this book. It turned out to be a relic of the 70 s, with all kinds of abstract philosophizing about how putting organic matter into soil is going to save the world. Perhaps revolutionary for its time, it's not very useful for the serious modern gardener.Although this thin book has gone through five reprints, the passing years seem to have added little in the way of real information. Sure, knowing how to turn soil with hand tools and make a compost pile is useful, but most modern books handle that in a couple of pages. The book's policy of zero tolerance for chemical fertilizer and pesticides is an admirable ideal but a tad too stringent for me. I found the charts little more than unfinished notes that were largely indecipherable. The book offers dubious, sometimes contradictory, advice, including instructions on planting by the phases of the Moon. Sources for supplies are referenced with old-fashioned snail-mail addresses rather than 1-800 numbers or URLs. The book has no index!Frankly, much of the text seems to be self-promotion for the Cause, worthy as it may be, rather than offering solid gardening tips. If you really want to grow more vegetables, get Dick Raymond's Joy of Gardening. He's plenty green and offers practical approaches to getting food out of the ground.

Mon, March 23, 2015 @ 1:53 PM

5. www.good2go.com wrote:
After reading the reviews of others, I excitedly bought this book. It turned out to be a relic of the 70 s, with all kinds of abstract philosophizing about how putting organic matter into soil is going to save the world. Perhaps revolutionary for its time, it s not very useful for the serious modern gardener.Although this thin book has gone through five reprints, the passing years seem to have added little in the way of real information. Sure, knowing how to turn soil with hand tools and make a compost pile is useful, but most modern books handle that in a couple of pages. The book s policy of zero tolerance for chemical fertilizer and pesticides is an admirable ideal but a tad too stringent for me. I found the charts little more than unfinished notes that were largely indecipherable. The book offers dubious, sometimes contradictory, advice, including instructions on planting by the phases of the Moon. Sources for supplies are referenced with old-fashioned snail-mail addresses rather than 1-800 numbers or URLs. The book has no index!Frankly, much of the text seems to be self-promotion for the Cause, worthy as it may be, rather than offering solid gardening tips. If you really want to grow more vegetables, get Dick Raymond s Joy of Gardening. He s plenty green and offers practical approaches to getting food out of the ground.

Thu, April 16, 2015 @ 11:41 AM

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